Mistakes That Make Your Website sound unprofessional

1. Improper Use of Template

I don’t condone using templates for large businesses, but I can see the need for them in small, bootstrapped startups. However if you end up using one, it’s a good idea to get a designer to properly customize it to your branding. You may even end up with a pretty good product.

A common problem on websites built with pre-designed templates is a weak visual connection between the logo and the rest of the website. There will be colours used in the logo that aren’t repeated anywhere on the website, or fonts that don’t fit well with ones used in the site.

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2. Using Dark Backgrounds

Background color covers the largest part of your website, so better choose it carefully.

As a rule of thumb, entirely black websites almost never look good, unless they’re professionally designed. White color is a safe bet, but even more designers use very light gray. Be aware that the darker the gray, the worse is readability of black letters on this background. It’s best to stay below 15% of black in gray to keep the design light.

3. Typography Contrast Issues

Fonts are a much bigger deal than most non-designers realize. They will make or break your entire design, even though they are just “letters”.

A common problem on “home-made” web designs is that there is too little contrast between headline and body fonts. Just implementing some size variation mostly doesn’t cut it. Try using a bolder weight for your headline font, and make it very obviously more important than the rest of the text. This will help with hierarchy and gently guide the eye through the website.

4. Unprofessional Copy

Writing well is hard, but it’s necessary to get your point across on the internet. Especially if you’re trying to sell something, you’ll need to make sure your copy is easy to understand, and have it checked by the proofreader to fix any spelling mistakes.

I oftentimes see awkward sentences in the website copy that seems to have been stuck there as a placeholder text from the prototype stages of design. It’s a good idea to have somebody read all the text before the site goes live.

5.Off-trend Design

Like it or not, we have bid adieu skeuomorphism for now and every website still using the gradient – and shadow- heavy web design is bound to look outdated. While you can get away with some 3D effect here and there, it’s best to explore your creative options inside the flat design guidelines.

So here you have it: 10 most common issues I have come across analysing a number of different startup homepages. Now go and review your website against the tips above!

6.Inconsistency

Your branding should ideally be very consistent. Everywhere you turn up, whether it be social media, Facebook ads, or offline, your customers should be able to immediately recognize your brand.

But let’s take a step back and first make sure that your website is consistent with itself. Have you got any legacy ul styles that are overwriting your body font? Are your logo’s colours exactly the same hex as those used on the website? Are you using the same shade everywhere or just “something similar enough”? Usually, just keeping your CSS files organized and deleting all unneeded code will fix these inconsistency problems.

7. Alignment and Spacing Problems

Spacing is hard. Leaving enough, but not too much white space around elements is probably the hardest part of figuring out design. But it can be simplified with a few rules. First, make sure all elements are properly grouped together, second, leave enough white space around those groups.